Cradle of Civilization

A Blog about the Birth of Our Civilisation and Development

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  • The Fertile Crescent

    The Fertile Crescent is a term for an old fertile area north, east and west of the Arabian Desert in Southwest Asia. The Mesopotamian valley and the Nile valley fall under this term even though the mountain zone around Mesopotamia is the natural zone for the transition in a historical sense.

    As a result of a number of unique geographical factors the Fertile Crescent have an impressive history of early human agricultural activity and culture. Besides the numerous archaeological sites with remains of skeletons and cultural relics the area is known primarily for its excavation sites linked to agricultural origins and development of the Neolithic era.

    It was here, in the forested mountain slopes of the periphery of this area, that agriculture originated in an ecologically restricted environment. The western zone and areas around the upper Euphrates gave growth to the first known Neolithic farming communities with small, round houses , also referred to as Pre Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) cultures, which dates to just after 10,000 BC and include areas such as Jericho, the world’s oldest city.

    During the subsequent PPNB from 9000 BC these communities developed into larger villages with farming and animal husbandry as the main source of livelihood, with settlement in the two-story, rectangular house. Man now entered in symbiosis with grain and livestock species, with no opportunity to return to hunter – gatherer societies.

    The area west and north of the plains of the Euphrates and Tigris also saw the emergence of early complex societies in the much later Bronze Age (about 4000 BC). There is evidence of written culture and early state formation in this northern steppe area, although the written formation of the states relatively quickly shifted its center of gravity into the Mesopotamian valley and developed there. The area is therefore in very many writers been named “The Cradle of Civilization.”

    The area has experienced a series of upheavals and new formation of states. When Turkey was formed in the aftermath of the genocide against the Pontic Greeks, Armenians and Assyrians perpetrated by the Young Turks during the First World War it is estimated that two-thirds to three-quarters of all Armenians and Assyrians in the region died, and the Pontic Greeks was pushed to Greece.

    Israel was created out of the Ottoman Empire and the conquering of the Palestinian terretories. The existence of large Arab nation states from the Maghreb to the Levant has since represented a potential threat to Israel which should be neutralised when opportunities arise.

    This line of thinking was at the heart of David Ben Gurion’s policies in the 1950s which sought to exacerbate tensions between Christians and Muslims in the Lebanon for the fruits of acquiring regional influence by the dismembering the country and the possible acquisition of additional territory.

    The Christians are now being systematically targeted for genocide in Syria according to Vatican and other sources with contacts on the ground among the besieged Christian community.

    According to reports by the Vatican’s Fides News Agency collected by the Centre for the Study of Interventionism, the US-backed Free Syrian Army rebels and ever more radical spin-off factions are sacking Christian churches, shooting Christians dead in the street, broadcasting ultimatums that all Christians must be cleansed from the rebel-held villages, and even shooting priests.

    It is now time that the genocide against the Pontic Greeks, Assyrians and Armenians is being recognized, that the Israeli occupation, settlements and violence against the Palestinians stop, and that the various minorities in the area start to live their lifes in peace – without violence and threats from majority populations, or from the West, and then specificially from the US.

    War in the Fertile Crescent
    https://aratta.wordpress.com/2013/11/13/war-in-the-fertile-crescent

    Everyone is free to use the text on this blog as they want. There is no copyright etc. This because knowledge is more important than rules and regulations.

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The Swastika

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The Swastika

The earliest swastika known has been found in Mezine, Ukraine. It is carved on late paleolithic figurine of mammoth ivory, being dated as early as about 10,000 BC. It has been suggested this swastika may be a stylized picture of a stork in flight and not the true swastika that is in use today.

Mirror-image swastikas (clockwise and anti-clockwise) have been found on ceramic pottery in the Devetashka cave, Bulgaria, dated 6,000 B.C. It appear in Neolithic China in the Majiabang, Dawenkou and Xiaoheyan cultures.

Swastikas also appear on pottery in archaeological digs in Africa, in the area of Kush and on pottery at the Jebel Barkal temples. It is seen in Egypt during the Coptic period. Textile number T.231-1923 held at the V&A Museum in London includes small swastikas in its design. This piece was found at Qau-el-Kebir, near Asyut, and is dated between AD 300-600.

The swastika is also seen in Iron Age designs of the northern Caucasus (Koban culture). Other Iron Age attestations of the swastika can be associated with Indo-European cultures such as the Indo-Iranians, Celts, Greeks, Germanic peoples and Slavs. In England, neolithic or Bronze Age stone carvings of the symbol have been found on Ilkley Moor.

The Tierwirbel (the German for “animal whorl” or “whirl of animals”) is a characteristic motive in Bronze Age Central Asia, the Eurasian Steppe, and later also in Iron Age Scythian and European (Baltic and Germanic) culture, showing rotational symmetric arrangement of an animal motive, often four birds’ heads. Even wider diffusion of this “Asiatic” theme has been proposed, to the Pacific and even North America (especially Moundville).

Solar symbolsThe swastika (卐)BorjgaliTriskelionThree haresGankyilTursaansydänSun crossCeltic crossBrigid’s crossIran Sun CrossSwastika StoneCamunian roseSwastika curveHuman Past

Reclaim the Swastika

Pro Swastika

Swastika

Swastika Plate 5000 BC – Model of the Milky Way

Wikipedia: Swastika

A Swastika Pictorial Atlas

Ancient Petroglyphs of Armenia

The Ancient Secret of the Swastika

The Power of Symbolism

Rosettes and  Ornamental Art

Sun Wheel – The Ancient Swastika

The Women’s Dance I: Southern Asia

The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Swastika

Greek Swastika: Ancient Origins of the Swastika in Ancient Greece

Swastika – in the “Vinca script” 6000-7000 BC

The Powerful Symbol of the Swastika and its 12,000 Year History

Swastika – Neolithic, Astrology

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Swastikas from around the world

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Swastika pattern on a mammoth bone bracelet from Mezin, Ukraine, 10,000 BC

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Swastika, Balkans, 7th-6th mill. BC

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Cucuteni-Trypillian, 6500 BC

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Swastika, Vinca, 5500-4800 BC\

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Samarra, Iraq, 5000 BC

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Swastika, Hassuna, 5500 BC

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Swastika, Ur, 3000 BC

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Elamite Bronze Age Bowl, 2500 BC

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Armenian Eternity Sign (Arevakhach)

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Swastika, Armenia

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Georgian Eternity Sign, Borjgali (“the flow of time”)

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Hands of Svarog with Swastikas

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Thunder Cross or Cross of Perun

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Kolovrat (“spinning wheel”); Polish: słoneczko (“little sun”) – the foremost symbol representing Rodnovery amongst East Slavic peoples and traditions

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Ingushetia National Flag

Solar emblem of Vainakh represents not only the sun and the universe, but also awareness of the oneness of the spirit in the past, present and future

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Old Avarian popular symbols appearing on stone and felt

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Avar, Kumyk

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Flag of Ust-Orda Buryat Autonomous Okrug

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Flag of the Isle of Man

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Flag of Sicily

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Kuna, indigenous people of Panama and Colombia

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Flag of India

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Swastika, a symbol of auspiciousness in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism

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Swastika seals, Indus Valley

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Bronze Age Mycenaean

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Kamares Ware plate. Faistos. Minoan culture, Crete (ca. 2100 – 1450 BC)

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Etruscan, Italy, 700-650 BC

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Swastika, Early Cycladik II, 2700-2300 BC

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Greek, Attica, ca. 780 BC

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Artemis with swastikas. Greece, circa 700 BC

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Thebes, Greece, 500 BC

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The swastika, the Phoenician sun symbol, on the Phoenician Craig-Narget stone in Scotland, and on the robe of a Phoenician high priestess

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La Olmeda, Spain, Ancient Rome

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Gaul, Lyon, France

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Fylfot on Picture Stone, 8th Century CE. Gotland, Sweden

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Nydam Mose, Denmark, 300-400

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Buckle from Oseberg Vikingship Buddha

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Runestone from Snoldelev, East Zealand, Denmark, 900 AD

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Anglo-Saxon, North Elmham, Norfolk, 500-600

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Swastika, China, Majiayao, Mid 3rd mill BC

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Triskele, China, 1200-650 BC

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Buddhist temple, Japan

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Antique Navajo

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Ghana, 1400 AD

 

 
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