Cradle of Civilization

A Blog about the Birth of Our Civilisation and Development

Similarities around the world

Posted by Fredsvenn on May 14, 2016

Gobekli/Portasar (“Mountain Navel”)

The first life-sized human statue, 11,000 years old, from Balikligol, Sanliurfa, next to Gobekli/Portasar

Venus – Neolithic

 Göbekli Tepe’s Shamanic Birthing Temple

The Statues and Symbolic Gestures that Link Ancient Göbekli Tepe, Easter Island, and Other Sites Around the World

Hands come together on the omphalos, or navel on monuments at many locations. Left: Gobekli Tepe. Right: Azerbaijan. Image via Özgür Etli.

Hands come together on the omphalos, or navel on monuments at many locations. Left: Gobekli Tepe. Right: Azerbaijan

Easter Island

Bolivia: Statue from Tiwanaku, Bolivia. A symbol of regional power, the humanoid statue stands with hands over navel.

Bolivia: Statue from Tiwanaku, Bolivia. A symbol of regional power, the humanoid statue stands with hands over navel

Balikligol Statue and Easter Island

Balikligol Statue and a 6,000 year old statue from Iran

Celtic Goddess, Balikligol Statue, and Pre-Dynastic Egypt

Balikligol Statue and Pre-Dynastic Egypt

Urfa statue & Chalcolithic Burial Cave at Peq’in, Israel

Mayan and Urfa

Anthropoid sarcophagi, Cemetery at Deir el-Balah, Late Bronze Age, 14th–13th century BCE, Pottery, Average H: 190 cm

Deir al-Balah

South of Gaza city, at Deir el-Balah, some fifty pottery sarcophagi were unearthed from a large, ancient cemetery. Located near the sea, the site had been protected from plunder by massive sand dunes. The sarcophagi were fashioned by hand, using the coil technique, the method employed for creating large vessels. They were then fired with their lids in an open fire. The lids were later refired in kilns located nearby, which accounts for their darker color. Similar cemeteries have been discovered near the Nile Delta.

Several features of the Gaza sarcophagi shows clear signs of Egyptian influence. At times the lids bear depictions of mummy-like figures, indicating the face, wig, arms, and hands of the deceased. Many of the faces have small beards, perhaps symbolizing the beard of Osiris, the Egyptian god of death, into whose realm the deceased was about to enter. The bodies of the dead, usually more than one, were laid unembalmed in the coffin, along with funerary gifts such as pottery food bowls. If the deceased was wealthy, elaborate jewelry and vessels made of stone and bronze were also added.

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