Cradle of Civilization

A Blog about the Birth of Our Civilisation and Development

Archive for December, 2008

Elamo-Harappan origins for Haplogroup J2 in India?

Posted by Fredsvenn on December 28, 2008

Elamo-Harappan origins for Haplogroup J2 in India?

The presence of Haplogroup J2 in India, including the subclades M410 and M241 has been an often overlooked clue to the origins of M172. Sengupta et al, in 2005 worked to explain the presence of M172 in India. Their paper provides an immediate acknowledgement of the proposed spread of proto-Elamo-Dravidian speaking peoples into India originating from the Indus Valley and southwest Persia. The idea that M172 may have been carried into India with proto-Elamo-Dravidian groups is supported by the frequencies of Haplogroup J in one of the only remaining Dravidian Speaking ethnic groups in the Iranian Plateau, the Brahui. 28% of the Brahui, an ethnic Dravidian speaking group from Western Pakistan were found to carry the mutation defining Haplogroup J. Overall Haplogroup J2 in India represented 9.1% of this very populous nation. In Pakistan, M172 accounted for 11.9% of the Y-Chromosomes typed. Sengupta’s paper broke down the frequencies of Haplogroup J2 into various caste and language groups. J2 was found to be significantly higher among Dravidian castes at 19% than among Indo-European castes at 11%. J2a-M410 in particular may be a strong candidate for a proposed migration of proto-Dravidian peoples from the Iranian Plateau or the Indus Valley since J2a M410 is a very high component of the haplogroup J2 chromosomes found in Pakistan. Over 71% of the M172 found in Pakistan was M410+.

Another interesting characteristic in the distribution of M172 and more specifically, M410, in India was its higher frequencies in Upper Caste Dravidians. M410+ chromosomes were found in 13% of Upper Caste Dravidians. Sengupta goes on to suggest an Indian origin of Dravidian speakers but from a Y chromosome perspective, the paper seems to acknowledge M172 arriving in India from Middle Eastern and Indus Valley Civilizations.

Despite an apparent exogenous frequency spread pattern of J2a toward North and Central India from the west, it is premature to attribute the spread to a simplistic demic expansion of early agriculturists from the Middle East….it may also reflect subsequent Bronze Age Harappans of uncertain provenance.

Subclades of M172 such as M67 and M92 were not found in either Indian or Pakistani samples which also might hint at a partial common origin. And while there may be multiple events and origins for M172 lineages in India, it does seem likely that the Indus Valley and Elamo-Dravidian speaking groups may be the origin of some of the M172 found in India today.

Peoples and Languages in Pre-Islamic Indus Valley

The Decipherment of Harappan Writing

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Visual History

Posted by Fredsvenn on December 28, 2008

How can you show the details of a history visually? Time provides one obvious dimension. What else can you show to tell the story? Most timeline charts use a 2D representation, time x {place or theme}. Some are more successful in integrating additional dimensions.

This page is an annotated visual gallery of some timeline designs from their origin to today. Although time is one-dimensional, telling some story of history visually is much more complex, and it is quite instructive to see together how different graphic designers have aproached this problem.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Haplogroup J2-M172 in Iran

Posted by Fredsvenn on December 28, 2008

Haplogroup J2-M172 in Iran

A 2008 Paper written by Nasidze et al, Close Genetic Relationship Between Semitic speaking and Indo-European speaking Groups in Iran, works to demonstrate that geography plays a much stronger role than language in determining genetic relatedness. The paper focuses on comparisons between the Bakthiari, an indo-european speaking population of Iran and Iranian Arabs. The Haplotype frequency table quickly demonstrates that the level of M172, Haplogroup J2 is fairly evenly distributed througout Iran’s geography and the population groups studied. In fact, it is the most common Haplogroup found in Iran overall and in the above listed study, present in 28% of Iranian Arabs and 25% of the Bakthiari. A full table of the haplogroup frequencies can be viewed here.

While there are some differences with respect to Haplogroup G, paragroup F* which includes J1 (M267) and Haplogroup T (M9), the authors go on to state:

The Iranian Arab group shows close affinities with the Bakhtiari and other Iranian Indo-European-speaking groups for both mtDNA and the Y chromosome. In fact, for both mtDNA and theYchromosome, all of the Indo-Europeanspeaking and Semitic-speaking groups from West Asia exhibit generally low levels of differentiation (i.e. Fst values are less than 0.05). The significant correlation between mtDNA and NRY Fst values, as shown by the Mantel test, further indicates that there are no substantial differences between patterns of mtDNA and NRY variation in this region of the world. The lack of significant differentiation between west Asian Semitic-speaking and Indo-European-speaking groups indicates that language has not been a substantial barrier to gene flow in this part of the world.

Iran shows some of the highest levels of Haplogroup M172 in the world. When one factors in the population of Iran, it may be one of the most populous countries of men bearing the mutation defining Haplogroup J2. But did Haplogroup J2 originate in Iran? This topic is far more complicated and most sources simply indicate its origin as the Northern Portion of the Fertile crescent which could include the northern Levant, Anatolia, Syria, Iraq or Iran. Certainly many subclades of Haplogroup J2 have likely developed outside Iran. Reguiero et al typed their DNA samples in Iran for numerous subclades of J2 which were not found to be present including M137, M158, M163, M280, M318, M319, M321, M339 and M340. These subclades more likely developed and spread from another area of the Near East. Thus Iran is likely not the source region for these particular subclades but could still be one of a few geographical regions of origin for some of the earliest M172 bearing men.


Haplogroup J2 M172 in Iran

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: